post

CTD for April 21, 2006

A quick catch up podcast (yeah…it’s been awhile).

On this show it’s about the path I’ve been on and, especially, how many of the things I’ve been learning about social connectedness, human consciousness, striving for meaning and other basic wisdom is now informing my thoughts and direction with respect to next generation internet.

It’s not just the flipper-flappers, dweebezaarb’s and other tactical technical protocols and formats that make a Web 2.0 destination. There are so many other intangibles that inform the creation of an online space…and I talk a bit about some of the exploration I’ve been doing with others in that realm.

Plus, I reveal how Homer Simpson is colluding with the National Security Agency to analyze all my television viewing through the magic of TiVo.  😉

Link to the podcast

post

CTD for March 3, 2006

It’s been a few weeks since I’ve done a podcast. I’ve been busier than a one-armed, wallpaper hanger but had a bit of time this afternoon and have really been missing it — so here you go. I’m geared up to continue the weekly podcast series so keep those earphones in.

This week’s show covers my current adventure…and some things you might want to consider if you’re working (but not feeling like you’re in the right spot) or are considering an entrepreneurial adventure of your own. Understanding your values, purpose and what puts a spring-in-your-step is key to creating your future, and there is some data you can gather that will help you understand yourself and the choices you make will become increasingly clear.

Staying with my roots of connecting dots, I then segue in to a discussion about Web 2.0 companies and this list of 907 of them…and something to consider before you embark on
investing your time, energy, effort or money in a new Web offering.

Link to the podcast

post

CTD for February 5, 2006

vintage-micNo…I’m not wearing a tinfoil hat but instead am connecting the dots. This week’s dots are U.S. intent on geopolitical, space and cyberspace dominance. The pieces are falling in to place to ensure that, over time, the ability to control (and perform surveillance on) the internet is achieved. Discussed in this podcast are the following:

  • Project for the New American Century. The PNAC proposes to control the new “international commons” of space and “cyberspace” and pave the way for the creation of a new military service “U.S. Space Forces” with the mission of space control.
  • At Stake: The Net as We Know It. “(I)n a Nov. 7 interview with BusinessWeek Online, AT&T CEO Edward Whitacre Jr. declared: “What [Google, Vonage, and others] would like to do is to use my pipes free. But I ain’t going to let them do that.” Whitacre and AT&T argue that they need flexibility to exact a toll from Web services that hog bandwidth.”
  • EFF Sues AT&T to Stop Illegal Surveillance: The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) filed a class-action lawsuit against AT&T Tuesday, accusing the telecom giant of violating the law and the privacy of its customers by collaborating with the National Security Agency (NSA) in its massive and illegal program to wiretap and data-mine Americans’ communications.

Link to the podcast

post

CTD for January 21, 2006

Lots to discuss:

Link to the podcast

post

CTD for January 10, 2006

borsch-cheap-cash-store
Perspective on the Microsoft, Google and Yahoo CES announcements; Apple’s announcement today; and a brief discussion about what I’m seeing with innovation and how that ties in to my great, great Grandfather’s store: Borsch’s Cheap * Cash * Store.

Link to the podcast

post

CTD for December 31, 2005

Has it really been a year of my blogging and podcasting?

An end of the year podcast discussing blogging, podcasting, citizen media, the flight of ad dollars from traditional media to internet-centric offerings, and being on the threshold of a new year filled with possibility.

Link to the podcast

post

CTD for December 21, 2005

a) Discussing the revelation of how President Bush authorized the National Security Agency (NSA) to spy domestically inside of the United States *and* what is possible with the rumored supersecret Echelon and its technology;

b) Fantastico as an add-on to CPanel at hosting companies;

c) Needs that remain unfulfilled with using open source software ’cause it’s just too hard to make it all work together;

d) Web 2.0 and the dirty little secret post #1 and #2; and some other miscellaneous ramblings.

Link to the podcast

post

CTD for December 11, 2005

Quick discussion of choosing our path in life as well as organizing the tsunami of data and content that threatens to drown us all. The tool Devonthink is discussed.

Link to the podcast

post

CTD for December 5, 2005

Morning Storm Approaching

Gadgets are discussed but mainly meditation, science and Steve’s pending next step. This photo (one of my favorites that I call “Morning Storm Approaching”) is a metaphor for where my head is at right now: a beautiful sunrise means a new day is dawning; clouds are rolling in meaning the day may be turbulent; but above all it is peaceful and serene — and I find storms are amazing and beautiful too.

Link to the podcast

post

CTD for November 27, 2005

In the now classic Christmas movie “It’s a Wonderful Life,” George Bailey (Jimmy Stewart) feeling trapped in “this crummy little town” has his world crash down around him. In Martini’s bar, he talks to God praying to please “show me the way.”

Most of us may not have seen how God resolved George’s dilemma if not for a copyright accident.

You may know the story of why this five-times-nominated (but never won while fading in to obscurity) for an Academy Award movie but if not, listen to this week’s podcast and how the story of It’s a Wonderful Life is an allegory for the current situation we all face with stale copyright laws, a remix culture, and the enabling tools combining to accelerate the demand for new ways of thinking about content and its protection.

Also listen to the segment “The Radar Screen” which covers topics that hit Steve Borsch’s radar screen this past week.

Link to the podcast